food

Corn & Hot Dog Bread (Recipe Video)


This savory hot dog bread is topped with a cheesy, creamy corn mixture and a ketchup drizzle that makes it taste like pizza! 

Wrapping hot dogs into a milk bread dough is widely popular in bakeries in East Asia and is a common breakfast or snack food. If you walk through the streets of Taiwan, you will walk past a bakery that sells fancy and extravagant breads like this one. Some bakeries that sell these breads are 85 C Bakery, Milkhouse, and Wu Pao Chun. Some of the flavor combinations sound odd, but they are all very delicious. The savory breads are topped with enough ingredients to where the bread is a whole meal itself! Some hot dog breads are topped with green onions, bell peppers, or kept plain, but a common topping is creamy corn and cheese. Since I love corn and cheese, I decided to top my bread with these ingredients.

This bread is insanely delicious and will be devoured really quickly. No leftovers! I highly recommend you to make this bread and get a taste of Asia because it combines an Asian bread dough with American flavors. The bread is relatively easy to make, but requires patience to let the dough rise. Yeast thrives in hot and humid places, so it is best to make the bread on a warmer day.

This is a large-batch recipe to make 10 of these hot dog breads. I made a large batch and shared it with friends and family. The breads are shaped like flowers because of the 5 “petals”. This shape makes it really presentable and also allows for a pull-apart bread.


Corn & Hot Dog Bread

 

yield: 10 bread

Ingredients:

For dough:

  • 4 2/3 c. bread flour
  • 7 tbsp. granulated sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 4 tbsp. unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 1/3 c. warm milk (2% fat or greater) (just slightly warm, do not overheat!)
  • 3 tbsp. yeast
  • egg wash (1 egg + 1 tsp water)

For filling and topping:

  • 10 hot dogs
  • 2/3 c. canned or frozen corn, thawed and drained
  • 2/3 c. chopped onion
  • 1/2 c. Kewpie mayo or regular mayo
  • 3/4 c. shredded cheese
  • 10 tsp ketchup (1 tsp. per bread), for drizzle
  • dried chopped parsley to top, optional

Directions (Includes hand-kneading and electric stand mixer instructions):

[Hand-Knead method]:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, yeast, and warm milk until completely dissolved. Let the yeast activate for 15-20 minutes.
  2. Pour in the bread flour, salt, and egg, and mix until sticky and combined. On a floured surface, pour out the dough and knead for about 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, add in the softened butter and knead for an additional 10 minutes OR more until the dough passes the windowpane test and springs back when pressed. The dough will temporarily separate due to the butter and seem like it won’t come together, but keep kneading and the dough will slowly incorporate.
  3. Lightly grease the bowl, place the dough (shaped into a ball) in the bowl, cover it with a larger pot or plate, and place in a warm area to rise for 1-2 hours. I placed my dough outside which was the perfect mix of heat and humidity.

[Stand Mixer Method]:

  1. In a stand mixer, pour the flour, granulated sugar, salt, eggs, butter, warm milk, and yeast into a stand mixer. Put the dough attachment on and knead on low for 11-12 min.
  2. Transfer the dough to a floured surface and shape the dough into a ball.
  3. Place in a large oiled bowl or container and set aside in a warm (around 80 F) area and allow the dough to double in size for 1 hour or 1 hr. 15 min, if needed.

[Continued instructions for both methods]:

  1. Gently flour a surface and pour the dough out. Shape the dough and portion it into 10 equal pieces.
  2. Take one piece of dough and lightly flatten out the dough to the length of the hot dog. Add the hot dog in the dough and wrap the dough up and pinch the edges.
  3. Use a knife to cut the hot dog dough into 6 equal pieces.
  4. Make a flower shape by placing one piece in the middle and placing the 5 other pieces around the middle. Not all the dough pieces have to be touching because a second bread rise will cause the dough pieces to stick together. Repeat this process for the other dough.
  5. Cover the bread flowers with a clean sheet of plastic wrap or foil and allow to rise in a warm place for 15 min.
  6. In the meantime, combine onion, corn, and mayo in a bowl and set aside.
  7. Preheat oven to 340 F.
  8. Take the bread and lightly brush the surface with an egg wash.
  9. Top the bread with about 2-3 tbsp. of corn mixture and a sprinkle of cheese. Drizzle the top with about 1 tsp. of ketchup. For the ketchup drizzle, you may use a squeezable bottle with a mini tip or place the ketchup in a sandwich bag and snip off a small piece of the corner of the bag. Repeat for all other breads.
  10. Bake the bread in the oven on the middle rack for 18-20 min.
  11. Remove the bread from the oven and allow the cool for at least 5 min. Top with chopped parsley and enjoy immediately or store in an airtight container.

The bread is best eaten within 3 days after baking. It can be stored in the fridge for up to 5 days in an airtight container, but will slowly dry out. Enjoy best while it’s fresh.

Categories: food

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8 replies »

  1. I finally got around to making the Corn & Hotdog Bread. It was super easy and good! I did the stand mixer method. Can’t get any easier than that. I cut the recipe in half and made 5 instead of 10 breads. My family and I had them for lunch today. Yum! Thanks for the recipe Jamie Lin!

  2. Oh mu god thank you so much for posting this!!! I go to H-Mart a lot and they sell these kind of food and I keep wondering how they made these. This is really helpful!

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